The question of crime: How much does the public have the right to know?

 

Author(s)Cameron-Dow, Joy
Title The question of crime: How much does the public have the right to know?
Source Pacific Journalism Review,Vol. 15, No. 2, 2009, pp. 71-84
Date 2009
Document type Journal Article
Coverage International
Summary The method by which crime is reported impacts the nature and content of information disclosed.   In particular, the internet has changed the way in which news is reported.   The author suggests that the sheer speed with which news can now be published, has impacted the traditional methods of 'gatekeeping' in editing and story selection.   The format of internet reporting not only allows the public to get a snapshot of the particular crime reported, as would usually be presented in the mainstream media, but also allows the public increased access to more detailed information in relation to the crime.   With the popularisation of the internet for the news consumer, the public have come to accept, and expect, this greater level of detail.   This calls into question the apparently disparate concepts of the public's right to know and the individual's right to privacy.   Do the two concepts suffer irreconcilable differences in media terms?
Keywords Media, privacy, right to know, journalist, internet, crime reporting.
Topic Media