Is domestic violence followed by an increased risk of psychiatric disorders among women but not among men? A longitudinal cohort study

 

Author(s) Ehrensaft, Miriam K., Terrie E. Moffitt, and Avshalom Caspi
Title Is domestic violence followed by an increased risk of psychiatric disorders among women but not among men? A longitudinal cohort study
Source The American Journal of Psychiatry,May 2006, Vol 163, No. 5, pp 885-892
Date 2006
Document type Journal article
Coverage New Zealand
Summary This study explores whether female victims of intimate personal violence (IPV) have more mental disorder consequences than male victims. Participants for the study were obtained from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study and assessments were made at 18 and 26 years using a longitudinal cohort design. The results showed that although many young adults who experienced abuse had a pre-existing psychiatric history, the experience of abuse is associated with a subsequent increase in psychiatric disorder among women but not among men. Women in abusive relationships were more likely than men to experience consequences such as depression, drug dependence and particularly PTSD. For men, the association between abuse and mental disorders appears to reflect their prior psychopathological profile.
Keywords Intimate partner violence; IPV; depressive symptoms; posttraumatic stress disorder; gender differences; psychiatric history; longitudinal study
Topic Domestic violence


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