Violence against people with disability in England and Wales: Findings from a national cross-sectional survey

Author(s) Khalifeh, Hind, Louise M. Howard, David Osborn, Paul Moran and Sonia Johnson
Title Violence against people with disability in England and Wales: Findings from a national cross-sectional survey
Source PLOS ONE,February 2013, Vol 8, Issue 2, pp 1-9
Date 2013
Document type Journal article
Coverage United Kingdom
URL

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0055952

Summary For this study data was analysed from the 2009/2010 British Crime Survey, a large national victimisation survey which introduced a measure of disability subtypes in 2009. It was found that odds for victimisation were highest among those with mental illness and long-term physical illness, followed by those with mobility problems and other disability. There was no significant association between violence victimisation and either sensory impairment or learning disability. The results showed that those with mental illness had significantly higher risk of violence victimisation and were more likely to suffer mental ill health following violence than those with other disabilities. Another important finding was that domestic violence was reported by a greater proportion of disabled than non-disabled victims. The authors estimated that about 8% of violence in the general population and half of violence among those with disability could be attributed to the independent effects of disability, resulting in an estimated additional 116,000 people with disability experiencing actual violence in England and Wales in 2009 at a cost of1.51 billion.
Keywords Disability; victimisation; crime survey; prevalence; risk estimates.
Topic Disability