​The effect of gender and perpetrator-victim role on mental health outcomes and risk behaviors associated with intimate partner violence

AuthorUlloa, Emilio C. and Julia F. Hammett
Title The effect of gender and perpetrator-victim role on mental health outcomes and risk behaviors associated with intimate partner violence
Source Journal of Interpersonal Violence, April 2016, Vol 31, No. 7, pp 1184-1207
Date 2016
Document type Journal article
CoverageUSA
SummaryThis study examines the prevalence and severity of a variety of mental health outcomes and risk behaviours resulting from IPV experiences. Data was extracted from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data set, resulting in a sample of 2,876 men and 4,311 women, with ages ranging from 18 to 28 years at Wave 3 and 25 to 34 years at Wave 4. The study examined depression, suicidality, alcohol use, illegal drug use and relationship satisfaction from a sample of men and women experiencing no violence, unidirectional violence (perpetrator-only or victimisation-only) and bidirectional violence. Findings showed that individuals experiencing bidirectional violence were generally at highest risk of negative mental health outcomes and those experiencing no violence were generally at lowest risk.  Individuals experiencing either of the two forms of unidirectional violence, that is perpetrator only and victimisation only, were found to be at a similar risk of experiencing negative mental health outcomes. Interesting results were that rates of depression were generally higher for women than for men, and men in the perpetration-only group at Wave 4, experienced higher levels of depression than men in the victimisation-only group. Recommendations for future research are discussed as well as implications for service delivery.
Keywords Intimate partner violence; IPV; longitudinal study; perpetrator-victim role; gender; mental health
Topic Male victims; domestic violence