The victim-informed prosecution project: a quasi-experimental test of a collaborative model for cases of intimate partner violence 

  

 

Author(s)Cattaneo, Lauren Bennett, Lisa A. Goodman, Deborah Epstein, Laurie S. Kohn and Holly A. Zanville
Title The victim-informed prosecution project: a quasi-experimental test of a collaborative model for cases of intimate partner violence
Source Violence Against Women, 2009, Vol. 15, No. 10, pp 1227-.1247
Date 2009
Document type Journal article
Coverage USA
URL http://scholarship.law.gwu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1181&context=faculty_publications
Summary This study evaluates the Victim Informed Prosecution (VIP) Program that ran from 2001 to 2007 at the District of Columbia U.S. Attorney's Office. The aims of the program were to provide intensive services from civil lawyers and advocates throughout their involvement with the system, and strengthen the victim's involvement and amplify the victim's voice. Advocates were from a community organisation rather than employed by the court. The main difference between this program and other court services was the coordination between its team members, with the civil lawyers and advocates acting as intermediaries between victims and prosecutors, in both directions. It was found that the aims of the VIP program, particularly coordination, were achieved in a limited degree. There was also some evidence that the program was associated with increased perceived victim voice in the court process, particularly with those victims who had greater contact with prosecutors. A recommendation was to minimise staff turnover in the prosecution office, and ensure an enduring commitment from all team members is maintained. It is also recommended that researchers develop better measures for assessing victim-oriented outcomes, such as voice and empowerment
Keywords Criminal justice system; advocacy; program evaluation; service delivery; victim empowerment
Topic

Criminal justice system