​System contact and procedural justice policing: improving quality of life outcomes for victims of crime

AuthorBarkworth, Julie and Kristina Murphy
Title System contact and procedural justice policing: improving quality of life outcomes for victims of crime
Source International Review of Victimology, May 2016, Vol 22, No. 2, pp 105-122
Date 2016
Document type Journal article
CoverageAustralia
SummaryThis study examines the role procedural justice policing plays in promoting crime victims' quality of life after system contact. For the study 171 victims of crime completed a survey which contained approximately 360 questions, covering topics such as perception of crime in the community, experiences of victimisation, encounters with police, satisfaction with police and attitudes towards police. The results from the study demonstrated that procedural justice can predict how crime victims feel about different aspects of their lives. Victims who believed that were treated in a procedurally unjust way by police officers were significantly more likely to feel anger, frustration and resentment and more likely to feel shame and embarrassment, and be tense and anxious. The researchers suggest that procedural justice may be able to be used effectively when police officers are called to an incident and recommend that all police officers receive training in procedural justice. Limitations of the study are discussed, including the relatively small sample size and the variety of different offences experienced by the victims, including violent crime, and non-violent crime such as motor vehicle theft.
Keywords Procedural justice; policing; crime victims; quality of life; emotion; well-being.
Topic Criminal justice system