​Does polyvictimization affect incarcerated and non-incarcerated adult women differently? An exploration into internalizing problems

Author(s) Radatz, Dana L. and Emily M. Wright
Title Does polyvictimization affect incarcerated and non-incarcerated adult women differently? An exploration into internalizing problems
Source Journal of Interpersonal Violence; 10 June 2015, online ahead of print, p 1-22
Date 2015
Document type Journal article
CoverageUSA
Summary This study explored polyvictimisation among incarcerated and non-incarcerated women and in particular examined its impact on internalising problems. Data was obtained from face-to-face interviews with 424 incarcerated and non-incarcerated women. Three research questions were addressed in the study: The extent of victimisation and polyvictimisation among incarcerated and non-incarcerated women; the impact of polyvictimisation on women's internalising problems such as alcohol and drug use; and whether high or low levels of polyvictimisation show different effects for internalising problems. Independent variables in the study included child abuse, IPV, sexual assault, traumatic life events, polyvictimisation, and demographics. A number of key results were found in the study including the finding that low polyvictimisation compared with no polyvictimisation was associated with an increased likelihood of alcohol and drug problems and attempted suicide. High polyvictimisation was identified as a risk factor for alcohol problems among women who enter the criminal justice system. A recommendation for future research was the need to develop a more standardised measure of polyvictimisation.   
Keywords Polyvictimisation; victimisation; female offenders; drug use; alcohol use; suicide; prisoners.
Topic Revictimisation