The help-seeking decisions of violent crime victims: An examination of the direct and conditional effects of gender and the victim-offender relationship

 

Author(s)Kaukinen, Catherine
Title The help-seeking decisions of violent crime victims: An examination of the direct and conditional effects of gender and the victim-offender relationship
Source Journal of Interpersonal Violence;April 2002; Vol.17; No. 4; pp 432-456
Date 2002
Document type Journal article
URL http://jiv.sagepub.com/content/17/4/432.full.pdf+html
Summary This article examines the help-seeking decisions used by male and female victims of violent crime. The data used in the analyses was sourced from the 1993 Canadian General Social Survey, Personal Risk (CGSS). It was found that many victims did not contact the police but a significant number of victims used alternative help-seeking strategies. Gender and the victim-offender relationship were found to determine the types of help-seeking strategies used by victims. For example, women were more likely to seek help from family, friends and social services and alternatively, attacks on men by strangers are the least likely to lead to alternative help seeking. The type of offense also distinguished different help-seeking strategies, with sexual assault victims less likely than any other crime victims to report to the police and an offence involving a weapon being used increased the likelihood victims would report to police. The author also discusses implications from the research for social service policy such as providing informal help providers with the skills, resources and information they need to appropriately support victims of crime.
Keywords Support; reporting to police; social services; victimisation.
Topic Victims needs