Gender and time differences in the associations between sexual violence victimization, health outcomes and risk behaviors 

 
Author(s)Choudhary, Ekta, Jeffrey H. Coben and Robert M. Bossarte
Title Gender and time differences in the associations between sexual violence victimization, health outcomes and risk behaviors
Source American Journal of Men' Health, September 2008, Vol. 2, No. 3, pp 254-259
Date 2008
Document type Journal article
Summary This study compares the association between sexual assault victimisation, negative physical and mental health outcomes and risk behaviors among male and female victims of sexual violence. Data for the study was obtained from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. It was found that lifetime sexual violence victimisation, which was measured as victimisation in the past 12 months and before the past 12 months, was significantly higher among females than males. Participants who reported victimisation within the past year reported significant associations between poor mental health, poor life satisfaction, smoking, and episodic drinking and victimisation. Among males reporting sexual victimisation in the past 12 months, only smoking was significantly associated with victimisation and for males reporting past sexual victimisation there were significant associations with poor life satisfaction and activity limitations. The authors, however, advised that the relatively smaller sample sizes of males, particularly those victimised in the past 12 months, precludes definitive conclusions. Future research is recommended to include a broader range of behaviours and longitudinal studies of health outcomes.
Keywords Sexual assault; sexual violence; gender differences; health outcomes; male victims
Topic

Sexual assault