Implications of court versus conference: the relationship between perceptions of procedural justice and shame management

 

Author(s)Scheuerman, Heather L. and Shelley Keith
Title Implications of court versus conference: the relationship between perceptions of procedural justice and shame management
Source Criminal Justice Policy Review,online November 2013,   pp 1-27
Date 2013
Document type Journal article
Summary This article, using data from the Australian Reintegrative Shaming Experiments (RISE) collected between 1995 and 1999, assesses how procedural justice relates to shame management. In this study offenders were observed and interviewed about their experiences with traditional court processing and restorative justice conferencing. Key dependent variables were shame acknowledgment, shame displacement, internalising shame and shame avoidance. It was found that relative to restorative justice, offenders perceived traditional court processing to be lower in all forms of procedural justice. Courts were associated with lower levels of shame acknowledgment and higher levels of shame displacement and avoidance. The strong association between voice and adaptive styles of shame management was seen as a reason why the restorative justice conference is more effective at reducing recidivism than court processing. Recommendations for future research are given, including the need to assess the causality of the relationship between procedural justice and shame.
Keywords Restorative justice; procedural justice; shame management; recidivism; court 
Topic Restorative justice