Victimization, resilience, and meaning-making: moving forward in strength

Author(s)Hill, James
Title Victimization, resilience, and meaning-making: moving forward in strength
Source Victims of Crime Research Digest, Issue No.2, 2009, Department of Justice Canada p3-9.
Date 2009
Document type Research report
Coverage Canada
URL http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/pi/rs/rep-rap/rd-rr/rd09_2-rr09_2/p1.html
Summary In this paper the author examines the key research findings around resiliency and discusses how workers can encourage growth and resiliency in their clients. Most victims of crime do not go on to develop mental health problems or access services and resilience can be seen as a continuum where each victim will have certain strengths and abilities that increase their resiliency. The victimisation process is examined, including the identification of strengths that may apply before or during the crime and after the crime and moving forward. From a clinical perspective it is easier to develop the strengths the person already has, rather than trying to add new ones during a stressful period. People face the challenge of criminal victimisation by applying coping strategies, both positive and negative. The challenge is to identify that core of strength and foster it to facilitate positive coping.
Keywords Coping strategies; resilience; victimhood; support
Topic Psychological effects and treatment